World

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
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0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Americas

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0
Deaths
0
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0
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0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Brazil Corona Virus Covid Statistics

Brazil

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Brazil

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
Country and CityTotal CasesDeathsRecovered
São Paulo4,390,006151,1290
Minas Gerais2,167,65355,2180
Paraná1,536,78839,8770
Rio Grande do Sul1,453,46835,1960
Rio de Janeiro1,308,19367,5840
Bahia1,240,27126,9760
Santa Catarina1,206,24319,5000
Ceará942,21624,3780
Goiás886,19523,9490
Pernambuco626,30819,8930
Espírito Santo599,21912,7700
Pará595,18116,7100
Mato Grosso540,09113,6470
Federal District511,14510,7200
Paraiba443,9279,3710
Amazonas427,18813,7560
Mato Grosso do Sul375,3639,6250
Rio Grande do Norte370,9147,3640
Maranhão358,71210,2150
Piauí322,9947,0680
Sergipe278,3466,0220
Rondônia267,6596,5520
Alagoas239,3706,2620
Tocantins226,8573,8340
Roraima126,3162,0180
Amapá123,2771,9890
Acre88,0101,8420
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Americas

  • Confirmed
    Deaths
    Recovered
    • Total
      0
      0
      0
      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

      World

      Confirmed
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      Deaths
      0
      Recovered
      0
      Active
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      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
      Country and CityTotal CasesToday casesDeathsToday deathsRecovered
      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
      • Portuguese Cardiology Foundation board member warns of Covid policy lapses

        By Teresa Gomes Mota, Cardiologist RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – What would the reality of cardiovascular diseases be, the leading cause of death in Portugal and the world, if the media were to dedicate the same amount of time each day as it does to Covid-19? When I began my professional life as a doctor, The post Portuguese Cardiology Foundation board member warns of Covid policy lapses appeared first on The Rio Times.

      Corona Virus (COVID-19) can make anyone seriously ill. But for some people, the risk is higher.

      There are 2 levels of higher risk:

      • high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable)
      • moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

      People at high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable) 

      People at high risk from corona virus include people who:

      • have had an organ transplant
      • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
      • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
      • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
      • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
      • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
      • have been told by a doctor they have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
      • have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
      • are
        taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections
        (such as high doses of steroids or immuno suppressant medicine)
      • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant

      People at moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

      People at moderate risk from corona virus include people who:

      • are 70 or older
      • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
      • have heart disease (such as heart failure)
      • have diabetes
      • have chronic kidney disease
      • have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
      • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
      • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
      • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
      • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)
      • are pregnant – see advice about pregnancy and corona virus

      What to do if you’re at moderate risk

      If you’re at moderate risk from corona virus, you can go out to work (if you cannot work from home) and for things like getting food or exercising. But you should try to stay at home as much as possible.

       

      Consider the following risks for getting or spreading COVID-19, depending on how you travel:

      Air travel

      Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, social distancing is difficult on crowded flights, and you may have to sit near others (within 6 feet), sometimes for hours. This may increase your risk for exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19.

      Bus or train travel

      Traveling on buses and trains for any length of time can involve sitting or standing within 6 feet of others.

      Car travel

      Making stops along the way for gas, food, or bathroom breaks can put you and your traveling companions in close contact with other people and surfaces.

      RV travel

      You may have to stop less often for food or bathroom breaks, but RV travel typically means staying at RV parks overnight and getting gas and supplies at other public places. These stops may put you and those with you in the RV in close contact with others.

      Social distancing, hand washing, and other preventive measures

      2Q==


      Published: March, 2020

      You’ve gotten the basics down: you’re washing your hands regularly and keeping your distance from friends and family. But you likely still have questions. Are you washing your hands often enough? How exactly will social distancing help? What’s okay to do while social distancing? And how can you strategically stock your pantry and medicine cabinet in order to minimize trips to the grocery store and pharmacy?

      What can I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

      The following actions help prevent the spread of COVID-19, as well as other coronaviruses and influenza:

      • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
      • Stay home when you are sick.
      • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
      • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces every day. High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. A list of products suitable for use against COVID-19 is available here. This list has been pre-approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use during the COVID-19 outbreak.
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water.

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