World

Confirmed
178,201,262
+15,773
Deaths
3,857,872
+316
Recovered
162,705,347
Active
11,638,043
Last updated: June 18, 2021 - 4:29 am (+00:00)

USA Corona Virus Covid Data Table Statistics USA

Confirmed
34,377,592
Deaths
616,440
Recovered
28,641,439
Active
5,119,713
Last updated: June 18, 2021 - 4:29 am (+00:00)

Indiana Corona Virus Covid Statistics

USA Covid Statistics

USA Covid Virus Statistics Graph

Country and CityTotal CasesDeathsRecovered
California3,806,18863,2520
Texas2,976,49952,2190
Florida2,352,99537,4480
New York2,108,97853,2500
Illinois1,392,63525,5520
Pennsylvania1,214,39527,5970
Georgia1,129,17721,1710
Ohio1,108,14620,1220
New Jersey1,020,56426,3640
North Carolina1,010,69813,3390
Michigan997,59520,8350
Arizona888,33717,8090
Tennessee865,75012,5060
Indiana753,77313,7640
Massachusetts709,18717,9570
Virginia678,39211,3360
Wisconsin676,7638,0460
Missouri624,5209,8330
Minnesota604,2777,6200
South Carolina595,3619,7990
Colorado555,8196,8560
Alabama548,32311,2880
Louisiana477,12710,6770
Kentucky464,1487,2240
Maryland461,7669,6980
Oklahoma455,3547,3570
Washington448,2635,8520
Utah410,8162,3240
Iowa403,4706,109364,610
Connecticut348,5958,2660
Arkansas344,9455,8690
Nevada328,4905,6420
Mississippi319,7047,3690
Kansas317,9505,1610
Nebraska223,9602,5170
Oregon206,0382,7760
New Mexico204,5774,3120
Idaho194,0842,1250
West Virginia163,3822,8630
Rhode Island152,3592,7240
South Dakota124,3932,0270
Montana113,2001,6510
North Dakota110,5511,5540
Delaware109,4701,6790
New Hampshire99,2251,3660
Alaska70,1833660
Maine68,7178540
Wyoming61,4257340
District of Columbia49,2321,1400
Hawaii37,1345070
Vermont24,3572560
Last updated: June 18, 2021 - 4:29 am (+00:00)

Indiana Covid Statistics County

Corona Virus (COVID-19) can make anyone seriously ill. But for some people, the risk is higher.

There are 2 levels of higher risk:

  • high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable)
  • moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

People at high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable) 

People at high risk from corona virus include people who:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
  • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
  • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
  • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
  • have been told by a doctor they have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
  • have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
  • are
    taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections
    (such as high doses of steroids or immuno suppressant medicine)
  • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant

People at moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

People at moderate risk from corona virus include people who:

  • are 70 or older
  • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
  • have heart disease (such as heart failure)
  • have diabetes
  • have chronic kidney disease
  • have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
  • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
  • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
  • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
  • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)
  • are pregnant – see advice about pregnancy and corona virus

What to do if you’re at moderate risk

If you’re at moderate risk from corona virus, you can go out to work (if you cannot work from home) and for things like getting food or exercising. But you should try to stay at home as much as possible.

 

Consider the following risks for getting or spreading COVID-19, depending on how you travel:

Air travel

Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, social distancing is difficult on crowded flights, and you may have to sit near others (within 6 feet), sometimes for hours. This may increase your risk for exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19.

Bus or train travel

Traveling on buses and trains for any length of time can involve sitting or standing within 6 feet of others.

Car travel

Making stops along the way for gas, food, or bathroom breaks can put you and your traveling companions in close contact with other people and surfaces.

RV travel

You may have to stop less often for food or bathroom breaks, but RV travel typically means staying at RV parks overnight and getting gas and supplies at other public places. These stops may put you and those with you in the RV in close contact with others.

Social distancing, hand washing, and other preventive measures

2Q==


Published: March, 2020

You’ve gotten the basics down: you’re washing your hands regularly and keeping your distance from friends and family. But you likely still have questions. Are you washing your hands often enough? How exactly will social distancing help? What’s okay to do while social distancing? And how can you strategically stock your pantry and medicine cabinet in order to minimize trips to the grocery store and pharmacy?

What can I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

The following actions help prevent the spread of COVID-19, as well as other coronaviruses and influenza:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces every day. High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. A list of products suitable for use against COVID-19 is available here. This list has been pre-approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use during the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.

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