World

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Europe

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

UK Corona Covid Virus Covid Statistics

UK

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

UK

Confirmed
0
Deaths
0
Recovered
0
Active
0
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
Country and CityTotal CasesDeathsRecovered
England7,187,635121,0210
Scotland607,7678,9300
Wales395,2476,0150
Northern Ireland258,5162,6180
Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

Europe

  • Confirmed
    Deaths
    Recovered
    • Total
      0
      0
      0
      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)

      World

      Confirmed
      0
      Deaths
      0
      Recovered
      0
      Active
      0
      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
      Country and CityTotal CasesToday casesDeathsToday deathsRecovered
      Last updated: October 19, 2021 - 2:52 am (+00:00)
      • New Zealand Covid cases rise to new record as young people bear brunt of infections

        Health officials have been unable to link more than half of the cases, possibly indicating further undetected spread in the communitySee all our coronavirus coverageNew Zealand has hit its highest daily case number since the pandemic began, with 94 new Covid-19 infections announced on Tuesday.Prime minister Jacinda Ardern said the rise in Covid cases was “incredibly hard,” and urged people to get vaccinated and to continue following the rules. Continue reading...

      • Army veteran on trial in Belfast over Troubles killing dies with Covid-19

        Trial of Dennis Hutchings, who was 80, has been adjourned for three weeks after he contracted the virusAn army veteran whose trial at Belfast crown court over a Troubles shooting was adjourned due to his ill health has died after contracting Covid-19, it has been reported.It is understood that Dennis Hutchings died on Monday. The trial had been adjourned for three weeks after he contracted Covid. Continue reading...

      • UK Covid cases near 50,000 in one day as No 10 warns of ‘challenging’ winter

        Reported number of cases rise steadily in October to reach highest level since 17 JulyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDowning Street has warned of “challenging” months ahead as UK coronavirus cases reached their highest level since mid-July.The reported number of Covid cases in the UK increased steadily through October and reached 49,156 on Monday, the highest reported since 17 July and a 16% rise in new cases over the past week. Continue reading...

      • UK lab investigated for false negative Covid tests is not fully accredited

        Neither Immensa nor Dante Labs has ever been accredited, Ukas says, contrary to government commentsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe private laboratory that is under investigation for potentially issuing more than 40,000 false negative Covid tests was not fully accredited to perform the work, contrary to assurances made by health officials.The UK’s independent accreditation service, Ukas, told the Guardian on Monday that neither Immensa Health Clinics Ltd nor its sister company, Dante Labs, had ever been accredited by the service, and that it had informed the Department of Health that statements suggesting otherwise were incorrect. Continue reading...

      • We must not allow Covid deaths to be ‘normalised’ | Letters

        Dr Jo Fayram hopes the apathy of the British public will not last; Professors Joe Sim and Steve Tombs condemn the government’s lamentable failures; Professor Patricia Deps reports on Brazil’s Covid inquiry; and Margaret Farnworth highlights a super-spreader football matchLast week the government’s response to Covid was criticised in a report by two Commons committees for apparently pursuing herd immunity by infection at the start of the pandemic. Continuing high Covid rates indicate that nothing has changed except the public’s ability to react. According to experts (Why Britons are tolerating sky-high Covid rates – and why this may not last, 15 October), a reason for this is the “normalisation” of Covid infection and deaths by the government. In reality, there is nothing normal about this “normalisation”. The UK is known as “plague island” in Europe. Surely it’s time we realised that the use of protective measures against Covid are working well across the Channel, while the UK government’s lack of action continues to lead to unnecessary illness, suffering and death. Let’s hope that the experts quoted in your article are right and that the apathy of the British public will not last.Dr Jo FayramDurham Continue reading...

      • Tell us: have you lost a loved one to Covid-19 who was unvaccinated?

        We’d like to hear from families of British people who died of Covid-19 and were unvaccinated. Share your experiences We are looking to speak with the families of British people who died of Covid-19 and were unvaccinated.We’d like to find out more about the circumstances around their Covid vaccination choices. Perhaps your relative hadn’t got around to having one – or there may have been concerns about the impact of the vaccination on their health. Continue reading...

      Corona Virus (COVID-19) can make anyone seriously ill. But for some people, the risk is higher.

      There are 2 levels of higher risk:

      • high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable)
      • moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

      People at high risk (clinically extremely vulnerable) 

      People at high risk from corona virus include people who:

      • have had an organ transplant
      • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy
      • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer
      • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors)
      • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
      • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine
      • have been told by a doctor they have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD)
      • have a condition that means they have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell)
      • are
        taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections
        (such as high doses of steroids or immuno suppressant medicine)
      • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant

      People at moderate risk (clinically vulnerable)

      People at moderate risk from corona virus include people who:

      • are 70 or older
      • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)
      • have heart disease (such as heart failure)
      • have diabetes
      • have chronic kidney disease
      • have liver disease (such as hepatitis)
      • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy)
      • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections
      • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids)
      • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above)
      • are pregnant – see advice about pregnancy and corona virus

      What to do if you’re at moderate risk

      If you’re at moderate risk from corona virus, you can go out to work (if you cannot work from home) and for things like getting food or exercising. But you should try to stay at home as much as possible.

       

      Consider the following risks for getting or spreading COVID-19, depending on how you travel:

      Air travel

      Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, social distancing is difficult on crowded flights, and you may have to sit near others (within 6 feet), sometimes for hours. This may increase your risk for exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19.

      Bus or train travel

      Traveling on buses and trains for any length of time can involve sitting or standing within 6 feet of others.

      Car travel

      Making stops along the way for gas, food, or bathroom breaks can put you and your traveling companions in close contact with other people and surfaces.

      RV travel

      You may have to stop less often for food or bathroom breaks, but RV travel typically means staying at RV parks overnight and getting gas and supplies at other public places. These stops may put you and those with you in the RV in close contact with others.

      Social distancing, hand washing, and other preventive measures

      2Q==


      Published: March, 2020

      You’ve gotten the basics down: you’re washing your hands regularly and keeping your distance from friends and family. But you likely still have questions. Are you washing your hands often enough? How exactly will social distancing help? What’s okay to do while social distancing? And how can you strategically stock your pantry and medicine cabinet in order to minimize trips to the grocery store and pharmacy?

      What can I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

      The following actions help prevent the spread of COVID-19, as well as other coronaviruses and influenza:

      • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
      • Stay home when you are sick.
      • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
      • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces every day. High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. A list of products suitable for use against COVID-19 is available here. This list has been pre-approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use during the COVID-19 outbreak.
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water.

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